Intermission

When watching a concert or a play, we get intermissions in between, a 15-minute break so that we could stretch or walk around a bit. It’s also a division for the next act or part. When watching television, there are commercial breaks where some people enjoy and some take the time to do other things before going back. Of course, the online streaming provides us pleasure in watching without interruption (except if the internet connection is too slow, which happens most of the time).

Sometimes we get annoyed by the interruptions and sometimes are grateful for the intermissions. It depends on how we view it. We may fall into a deep pit and get lost in the wilderness, but there is definitely something deeper than the pain, the significance of the event or situation we have been put through.

During intermissions, we get to pause and ponder; and as always, the trials in life happens for a reason, as is the good things in life that we experience.

It’s impossible to pass through life without experiencing times when you cannot see your way through a deep valley. Times when the package delivered at the back door comes delivered in the ugly wrapping of death or affliction or illness or even divorce. . . John Selden, the old British jurist and scholar, put it even more bluntly. “Pleasure is nothing else but the intermission of pain.”

You may find yourself enjoying the intermission. Today, you may be smiling. Your heart may be light and merry. Perhaps answers to prayer have come beautifully and deliberately. You are swept away in delight. But it’s also quite possible that you are caught in the grip of affliction. You may be going through some of the hardest days of your life. You may be wondering Why? Why? Why this trial?

When you persevere through a trial, God gives you a special measure of insight. You become the recipient of the favour of God as He gives to you something that would not be learned otherwise.

 

(Taken from Charles Swindoll’s Wisdom for the way, entitled “Pleasure and Pain”.)

2 thoughts on “Intermission

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s